The role of the supernatural in hamlet and macbeth two tragic plays by william shakespeare

In Hamlet and Macbeth, the origin of any of these supernatural elements is always questioned, and never determined.

The play within the play, framed and acted before the court, whether like the scene of his father's death or not, is near enough to "catch the conscience of a king.

Except to enfeeble her powers, they play no part. There is in "Hamlet" and "Macbeth" neither veritable ghost nor witch, but only a semblance of these; there is a subtile working out of results through human belief in such agencies and in their presence and potency.

Curiously, it is not even mentioned in the two concluding acts, not when Hamlet is alone, when the over-wrought mind would have given out some note of it, if it were still remembered, not even in the friendly communings of Hamlet and Horatio, not even in the suggestive graveyard scene.

An exuberance of magic about a thin dramatic thread! Thus each is made, not only a rigidly practical drama of human life, motive and action, strictly governed by natural laws of daily force and operation, but each is also invested with a rare poetic charm such as no dramatist save Shakespeare has ever been able to cast about his work, with the single exception of Goethe, in "Faust," in which, however, the purely poetic supernatural element is employed.

His mother sees nothing although her attention is especially called to it. Prospero seems to mean that when we die, we awake from the dream of life into true reality-or at least into a truer dream.

But in a broader sense, in combination of beauty and terrible is hidden entirely different meaning: Inevitably the characters of these plays decide that they really do see Ghosts and weyard women, dreamlike visions in waking moments.

Thus, the supernatural is a recurring aspect in many of Mr. In both cases the supernaturalism is merely a convenient stage expedient for representing the dreams of good and bad men upon the eve of battle. Made bold by prophecies and driven by the illusion of his own glory, Macbeth kills the king.

With the rest, merely some strange apparition, like many strange appearances, accounted for or unaccountable, all thought of it would have faded utterly within a brief time.

Not merely the atmosphere and setting is magical as in "The Tempest," all is spell, charm and incantation. This, briefly and meagrely told, is the sole part of the apparent supernatural in "Macbeth. In act one, three witches open the play with thunder and lightening.

It is true that there is a further prophecy by the witches which deserves consideration. O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

With the rest, merely some strange apparition, like many strange appearances, accounted for or unaccountable, all thought of it would have faded utterly within a brief time. Wonderful as is the complete investment of the entire drama with a very "Sleepy-Hollow" spell of enchantment, the ghost actually comes from the other world merely to tell Hamlet, that, instead of having been stung by a serpent while sleeping in his orchard, the king was slain by a subtile poison poured into his ear.

In this interpretation there is an undeniable truth, as witches only repeat the thoughts of Macbeth. It appears thrice to three persons, and the third time also to Hamlet, to whom it makes ghostly impartment of the manner of his father's death.

It first appears to the watchmen, Marcellus and Bernardo, along with Horatio near the guardsmens' post. In two such plays, Hamlet and Macbeth, the supernatural is an integral part of the structure of the plot.

Beware Macduff, the armed head tells him; no man of woman born will harm you, says the bloody child; a crowned child with a branch — probably a representation of Malcolm — assures him that he will be defeated only when Birnam Wood comes to Dunsinane.

In "Hamlet," the dramatist is at great pains to give his ghost thorough verification. Again, the witches tell him that he need not fear till Birnam wood shall come to Dunsinane, nor then until he shall be assailed by one not of woman born. Macbeth himself embodies the combination of the beautiful and terrible.

O, these flaws and starts, Impostors to true fear would well become … Macbeth, 3.

Supernatural in Shakespeare's Plays

The darkly brooding soul of Macbeth hears, heeds and acts. Macbeth, too, must doubt what he sees: It is pure supernaturalism of the poetic kind. The ghost of Banquo, "blood-boltered," appears to Macbeth. The dramatist's purpose in the second introduction was for its effect upon the spectator, to continue the spell of mystery, for it really plays no other part.

Disscuss supernatural elements in Hamlet.

Prospero raises and lays the storm, calls spirits from the vasty deep, sends his minions to plague Caliban, to lead the shipwrecked mariners hither and thither about the enchanted isle, to bring prince and maid together, to confound treason, to daze and mislead Caliban and his drunken companions, to provide celestial music, serve celestial feasts, summon gods and goddesses, and to call nymphs and naiads to featly dance upon the yellow sands of the shelving shore.

Still, we see a difference here: For all the witnesses that may testify to the appearance of the ghost, the suggestive point is that it is of no importance to any but Hamlet. While Shakespeare has also made use of the supernatural as a subtile and mysterious poetical atmosphere, cast like a spell-working autumn haze about his two greatest dramas, yet, viewing it from the purely dramatic standpoint, as a motive force to human action, he has used it precisely and only as in the example just given.

In Hamlet and Macbeth the supernatural is an integral part of the structure of the plot. Their nature is so mysterious as to allow us to believe that they are both. Except as a poetic investiture none of that wondrous supernatural, with its weird creations, from the light, delicate Ariel down to the grotesque and earthy Caliban, is absolutely necessary to the dramatic results sought of natural creations, running from the pure and graceful Miranda down to the swinish Trinculo and Stephano.

When it appears to Hamlet, and to him alone, in his mother's chamber, it is becomingly clad in night robes — "My father in his habit as he lived! The point of this comparison is as follows:In two such plays, Hamlet and Macbeth, the supernatural is an integral part of the structure of the plot. It provides a catalyst for action, an insight into character, and an.

The Supernatural in Hamlet and Macbeth Essays Words | 5 Pages. The Supernatural in Hamlet and Macbeth In both Hamlet and Macbeth, the supernatural plays a very important role. Supernatural elements are crucial to the plot and they also have a more thematic part as well.

In this Shakespeare stands alone, and it is thus used by him only in the two great dramas of "Hamlet" and "Macbeth." A fair illustration of the poetic method is found in Goethe's "Faust," his great dramatic poem, where Mephistopheles, by supernatural power, turns back the tide of life, makes young again the aging Faust, and fills the new-made.

In the time of William Shakespeare there was a strong belief in the existence of the supernatural. Thus, the supernatural is a recurring aspect in many of Mr. Shakespeare¹s plays. In two such plays, Hamlet and Macbeth, the supernatural is an integral part of the structure of the plot.

In this Shakespeare stands alone, and it is thus used by him only in the two great dramas of "Hamlet" and "Macbeth." A fair illustration of the poetic method is found in Goethe's "Faust," his great dramatic poem, where Mephistopheles, by supernatural power, turns back the tide of life, makes young again the aging Faust, and fills the new-made.

- A common motif in Shakespeare’s many plays is the supernatural element, to which Hamlet, with the presence of a ghost, is no exception. The story of Hamlet, the young prince of Denmark, is one of tragedy, revenge, deception, and ghosts.

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The role of the supernatural in hamlet and macbeth two tragic plays by william shakespeare
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